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News

PRESENT SCENARIO OF DRINKING WATER

No drinking water in India by 2040: How will Government tackle this problem ?

-Reference : News

As mentioned above, the every available resources of drinking water in India will get empty very soon so,as a patroit citizen of a country we should think off this problem and must overcome on it very soon either our new generations will payoff for that.

Water resources are sources of water that are useful or potentially useful. Uses of water includes agriculture, industrial, household, recreactional and enviourement activities.

97% of the water on Earth is salt water and only three percent is fresh water slightly over two third of this is frozen in glaciers and polar ice caps. The remaining unfrozen freshwater is found mainly as grondwater, with only a small fraction presrent above ground or in the air.

Fresh water is renewable resoure, yet the world’s supply of groundwater is staedily decresing, With deplation occuring most prominently in Asia and North America, although it is still unclear how much natural renewable balances this usage, and whether ecosystems and threatened. The framework for allocating water resources to water users (where such a framework existc ) is Know as water right.

- HOW MUCH WASTE WATER IS GENERATED IN A RESIDENTIAL COMPLEX ?

As per standards laid down by CPHEEO (Central Public Health Engineering & Engineering Organization ), the fresh water consuption per day per person should be between 135-150 liters per day. It is officially expressed as “liters per capita daily”(LPCD).

By the large public water supply and sewerage bodies/authorities all across the country use the former figure to work out probable water consuption. When water is consumed by people living in a residential complex without access to an underground sewerage/drainage system,the amount consumed is estimated to be 135 LPCD. The total quantity (No. of residets X 135liters)comes into a sewage without treatment plants(STP) in the premises, and this total volumes has to be treated by STP. In a vast majority of cases, the actual waste generated exceeds this figure comfortably leading to overloading of the STP. This happens routinely beacase almost all residentianl complexes do not install water meters or similar water volume and flow measurement devices to keep track of water consumption in a residetial complex / gated community. Consequently when a device is installed and reading monitored, consumption has been found to be double and sometimes triple the suggested of 135LPCD.

FRESH WATER IN THE FUTERE

Many areas of the word are already exeperiencing stress on warer avaibility. Due To the accelarated pace of population growth and increase in the amount of water a single person uses, it is expected that this situation will continue to get worse.

A shortage of water in the future would be determentel to the human population as it would affect everything from sanitation, to overall helth and the production of grain also. The Future of Water Requires a Sustainable, Blue Path

To be able to adequately feed and support the world is growing population our global economy needs to continue to grow. Water is critical to future growth. However, it can also become the major limiting factor to growth. For example, businesses in water-scarce areas are already at risk, and so investors are more and more taking water supply into consideration during their decision-making processes. Given today’s approach to water management, so much growth can be sustained. Gains in efficiency and productivity in water management and utilization can reduce these risks and enable higher levels of sustainable growth, but how much higher? How far-reaching do those gains have to be? In addition, can we make a difference in a timely enough manner by understanding that the path for sustainable growth requires more than green solutions – but also requires blue ones?

The answers are position in examining current demand and supply pressures and looking at trends within each. Demand pressures include population growth and an increase in water-intensive diets as a portion of the population moves into more and higher water-consumption behaviors. Demand pressures also include growing urban, domestic and industrial water usage. Climate change plays a role by creating additional water demand for agriculture and for reservoir refill. On the supply side, issues such as water transport, availability and variability present challenges, as does the decline in renewable water resources. In nearly every one of these categories, trends are moving in the exact opposite direction necessary to sustain future growth. Taken together, these trends create “water stress.” In addition, the resulting ecosystem pressures along with economic and political conflict only exacerbate that stress.

All mentioned things shows that it is very important for us to save each and every drop of water and not to waste that we have to utilize it properly and that is our motto and as we are preparing our unit to overcome this motto starting in gujarat next to pan india.